Categories
Announcements

COVID-19 Update from Mayor Strickland (4-30)

After careful study of the data, and on the advice of our medical experts including the Shelby County Health Department, I along with Shelby County Mayor Lee Harris and the six surrounding municipal mayors announced earlier today that May 4, 2020 is the date that we will begin Phase 1 of our Back-to-Business framework.

Our data has been trending in the right direction, and we believe it’s time to methodically start opening our economy back up to get Memphians working again. As we have said since the beginning, we will continue to monitor this situation very closely to make sure our citizens remain safe and healthy.

The full Back-to-Business plan and more in-depth information on our COVID-19 Protocol requirements can be seen here.

A word from Dr. Jon McCullers

Dr. McCullers serves as Dunavant Professor and Chair, Department of Pediatrics

Senior Executive Associate Dean of Clinical Affairs

Chief Operating Officer

College of Medicine, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center

Pediatrician-in-Chief, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital

Starting roughly a week after Mayor Strickland’s Safer at Home Executive Order took effect, we have seen a stable rate of new cases per day between 60 and 70. If we look over the last four weeks, that has been 66 new cases per day on average. We do see variations in the data when looking at daily changes; we test more on Fridays and Saturdays and less on Sunday which have caused some highs and lows (weather also impacts the community testing), but the trend is clear – the Safer at Home Order has tamped down community transmission such that our rate of new cases is now stable.

The trend in hospitalizations, ICU utilization, and ventilator utilization has clearly been downward from its peak in early April (see graph attached). There is variation from the PUIs and day-to-day in bed utilization, but we had several cases in early April. We have much fewer now, and capacity is good at present. As we move forward, this is one measure I am most interested in watching for upward trends.

Additionally, I believe testing capacity in the community is continuing to expand and to reach more areas of the community. I feel very comfortable that we have sufficient capacity in the community at present by two measures:

  1. We are only utilizing about 45% of our capacity at present, and
  2. The positivity rate has been around 5% over the last week or so when you exclude the targeted testing in jails/nursing homes. My target for community testing capacity is to stay around a 4% mark or lower, because that is where successful countries have fallen on the scale.

Overall, I feel like we have a stable rate of new cases, believe we have a stable rate of new cases, have seen a decline in utilization of hospital beds and are now in a steady state with day to day variation in bed utilization. We have sufficient capacity in the hospitals, in our testing capacity, and public health areas to justify relaxing some restrictions at this time. Throughout the reopening, we will continue to monitor the data as it comes to us.

Shelby County Health Department COVID-19 Daily Update: April 30, 2020

COVID-19 Cases
Shelby County Cases2484
Deaths47
Total Tested in Shelby County28,124
Tennessee Total Cases10,366*
*As of 2:00 p.m. 4/29/20
Other Jurisdictions:
Tipton County, TN98
Desoto County, MS277
Crittenden County, AR181
Numbers current as of 10:00 a.m. 4/30/2020

Shelby County currently has 2484 confirmed COVID-19 cases. The total number of deaths in Shelby County attributed to COVID-19 to 47.

Total COVID-19 Cases Recovered in Shelby County as of 04/29/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Note: “Recovered“ is defined as (1) people who are living and have been confirmed to be asymptomatic by the health department and have completed their required isolation period

or (2) are at least 21 days beyond the first test confirming their illness.

The Shelby County Health Department is investigating clusters of infection in a number of facilities that serve vulnerable populations.

Map of COVID-19 testing in Shelby County as of 04/29/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Map of COVID-19 Positive test in Shelby County as of 04/29/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Here is a breakdown of current cases in Shelby County by age range:

COVID-19 Cases in Shelby County by Age as of 04/29/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

COVID-19 Cases in Shelby County by Age as of 04/29/2020

Missing/Unknown = 39 (1.6 %)

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Shelby County COVID-29 Cases by Race and Ethnicity as of 4/29/20

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Shelby County Health Department has added a data page to its COVID-19 webpage: www.shelbytnhealth.com/coronavirus.  It includes information about the geographic distribution of COVID-19 cases in Shelby County.

All of Shelby County, including the municipalities and the unincorporated areas are under Safer at Home orders. Only essential businesses as spelled out in Shelby County Mayor Lee Harris’s executive order of March 24, 2020, may remain open to the public. All assemblies and gatherings of more than 10 people outside of a private residence are prohibited. The list of essential and non-essential businesses can be viewed here.

For more information about the Safer at Home order or to register concerns, the public may contact:

· The Shelby County Mayor’s Action Line: 901-222-2300

· The Shelby County Health Department’s COVID-19 Hotline: 833-943-1658

· Email shelbytnhealth@shelbycountytn.gov.

Categories
Announcements

Memphis & Shelby County to Enter Phase 1 of Back-to-Business Plan

DATE: Thursday, April 30, 2020

After careful study of the data, and on the advice of our medical experts including the Shelby County Health Department, the mayors of Memphis, Shelby County, and the six surrounding municipalities have determined that May 4, 2020 is the date that we can begin phase one of our Back to Business framework.

“As we said at the beginning of this week, our data was trending in the right direction. Along with our doctors, we believe it’s time to slowly start opening our economy back up and get Memphians working again. As we have said since the beginning, we will continue to monitor this situation very closely to make sure our citizens remain safe and healthy.” – Mayor Jim Strickland, City of Memphis

“As we enter the first phase of the economic recovery, I have to note that members of our community have made serious sacrifices. We have residents who have put their livelihoods and their ability to take care of their families on the line. We have healthcare employees and other frontline workers who have continued to serve through a very tough period of hardship. As we enter Phase 1, we must continue to be vigilant as a community. We must expand our efforts to protect vulnerable groups. And, if there is a significant flare up, we must be prepared to be honest about it.” –Mayor Lee Harris

“We have been watching the data carefully and have continued to improve, particularly in hospital capacity and testing capacity, both of which continue to expand. Over this next phase, we will need to commit to expand our public health capacity to conduct investigations and aggressively respond to clusters as they emerge.” –Dr. Alisa Haushalter, Director, Shelby County Health Department

“Based on the data, I believe we have a stable rate of new cases, have seen a decline in utilization of hospital beds and are now in a steady state with day to day variation in bed utilization. We have sufficient capacity in the hospitals, in our testing capacity, and public health areas to justify relaxing some restrictions at this time. Throughout the reopening, we will continue to monitor the data as it comes to us.” – Dr. Jon McCullers, UTHSC

“I’m glad to stand beside all the mayors of Shelby Co in support of announcing a date to reopen. The Health Department plays a vital role in our community, but we as elected leaders have to look at the overall health of our entire community. Our citizens are crying for help on so many levels, and we need to help them on every level possible by re-opening with guidelines.” – Mayor Mike Wissman, City of Arlington

“We are pleased to announce that the Town of Collierville is doing what is best for our community and will be re-opening businesses next week.” – Mayor Stan Joyner, Town of Collierville

“Effective Monday, May 4, 2020 the City of Bartlett, along with Shelby County and the other municipalities within Shelby County, will be entering into Phase I of the Back-toBusiness framework document. We, as others, are anxious to get the economy started again. This does not mean that you should let your guard down. Some people will still need to stay at home.” – Mayor Keith McDonald, City of Bartlett

“We are grateful for your thoughtful diligence in following the guidelines for staying home and practicing social distancing. While these practices have gotten us to the point where we are comfortable with a phased reopening of our economy, it’s not the time to forget those good habits that we have established. Stay home when you can, wash your hands and wear a mask in public. We must work together to ensure that this reopening is successful.” –Germantown Mayor Mike Palazzolo

“Today, I’m excited to stand with the leadership of Shelby County and announce the date for reopening our businesses. I want to thank the citizens and businesses of Lakeland for their patience and cooperation during these unprecedented times. This is only the first step in the process and we must remain vigilant with safety measures including social distancing, wearing masks, and staying home as much as possible. I’m confident that as a community we can achieve success and get back to a sense of normalcy.” –Mayor Mike Cunningham, City of Lakeland

“We’ve been working together for weeks on this, and I appreciate the unified effort. I believe this is the best way to move forward, in unity.” –Mayor Terry Jones, City of Millington

To see the full plan guidelines, visit COVID19.memphistn.gov

Categories
Announcements

COVID-19 Update from Mayor Strickland (4-29)

For our business owners—as we look to slowly reopen our economy, it is very important that you familiarize yourself with our Back-to-Business plan and the COVID-19 Compliant Protocols listed within it.

The protocols are for you and your employees’ safety, as well as, the safety of your customers. We want to get things moving again, but we can’t do it at the expense of the public health.

The protocols cover five areas:

  1. Signage
  2. Measures to protect employee health (where applicable to the facility)
  3. Measures to protect visitor/customer health
  4. Measures to ensure physical separation
  5. Measures to prevent unnecessary contact

The full plan and more in-depth information on protocol requirements can be seen here.

As I’ve said over and over again, we are going to listen to what the medical experts tell us and our decisions will be based on data and not a specific date to reopen.

Continuing to answer the call

I just want to take a minute to say how proud I am to get the chance to work with so many amazing people during this very difficult time. Several weeks back now, we were faced with a very serious issue of potentially not being able to provide food to Shelby County Schools children.

We were determined not to let that happen.

Thanks to our great partners at the YMCA of the Mid-South, Mid-South Food Bank, and the University of Memphis and its catering partner Chartwells we have been able to serve millions of pounds of food and hundreds of thousands of meals to children and families in need.

Alone we can do so little, but together we can tackle any challenge. Thank you again, to everyone involved for making this happen.

If you would like to donate, you can do so here and here.

Below are slides with more details on food distribution.

Breaking down the numbers

Below is a quick look at today’s numbers.

Shelby County Health Department COVID-19 Daily Update: April 29, 2020

COVID-19 Cases
Shelby County Cases2403
Deaths46
Total Tested in Shelby County26,481
Tennessee Total Cases10,005*
*As of 2:00 p.m. 4/28/20
Other Jurisdictions:
Tipton County, TN96
Desoto County, MS272
Crittenden County, AR177
Numbers current as of 10:00 a.m. 4/29/2020

Shelby County currently has 2403 confirmed COVID-19 cases. The total number of deaths in Shelby County attributed to COVID-19 to 46.

Total COVID-19 Cases Recovered in Shelby County as of 04/28/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Note: “Recovered“ is defined as (1) people who are living and have been confirmed to be asymptomatic by the health department and have completed their required isolation period

or (2) are at least 21 days beyond the first test confirming their illness

The Shelby County Health Department is investigating clusters of infection in a number of facilities that serve vulnerable populations.

Map of COVID-19 testing in Shelby County as of 04/28/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Map of COVID-19 Positive test in Shelby County as of 04/28/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Here is a breakdown of current cases in Shelby County by age range:

COVID-19 Cases in Shelby County by Age as of 04/28/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

COVID-19 Cases in Shelby County by Age as of 04/28/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Shelby County COVID-29 Cases by Race and Ethnicity as of 4/28/20

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Shelby County Health Department has added a data page to its COVID-19 webpage: www.shelbytnhealth.com/coronavirus.  It includes information about the geographic distribution of COVID-19 cases in Shelby County.

All of Shelby County, including the municipalities and the unincorporated areas are under Safer at Home orders. Only essential businesses as spelled out in Shelby County Mayor Lee Harris’s executive order of March 24, 2020, may remain open to the public. All assemblies and gatherings of more than 10 people outside of a private residence are prohibited. The list of essential and non-essential businesses can be viewed here.

For more information about the Safer at Home order or to register concerns, the public may contact:

· The Shelby County Mayor’s Action Line: 901-222-2300

· The Shelby County Health Department’s COVID-19 Hotline: 833-943-1658

· Email shelbytnhealth@shelbycountytn.gov.

Categories
Announcements

COVID-19 Update from Mayor Strickland (4-28)

Back-to-Business

As explained yesterday, one of the measures to be considered in proceeding into Phase 1 of the Back-to-Business plan is whether the number of new cases of COVID-19 are stable or declining over a 14-day period. Yesterday at the press conference, the Shelby County Health Department said that our community had experienced seven to ten days of encouraging numbers before last weekend, and that they would analyze the increase in testing and positive cases before determining its impact on the Back-to-Business plan. We’re hopeful that when we do hear back from them, we will have a more clear picture of where we stand and when we can begin the work to lead us into Phase 1.

Helping Businesses

Earlier this month, we announced a couple of micro-loan programs. On April 13th, the City of Memphis Office of Business Diversity & Compliance (OBDC) Economic Emergency Hardship (EHE) Loan Fund was announced, and in less than two weeks, we received 115 inquires.

Today, I am announcing in the first round of the EHE–$30,000 in loans—has been approved for the following businesses:

I want to thank Joann Massey and her team at OBDC for their work supporting our minority and women business community during this time.

Remember, this is only the first round of funding and OBDC continues to accept applications. You can contact OBDC directly at 901-636-9300 or email Loan Administrator, Jerry Brack at jerry.brack@memphistn.gov

Additionally, the Economic Development Growth Engine (EDGE) Neighborhood Emergency Economic Development (NEED) Grant has received over 90 applications and will be presenting 10 to their Finance Committee for approval this Friday. The NEED Grant fund is also still open and is accepting contractors as well. You can access their application online at the EDGE website www.growth-engine.org

Breaking down the numbers

Below is a quick look at today’s numbers.

Shelby County Health Department COVID-19 Daily Update: April 28, 2020

COVID-19 Cases
Shelby County Cases2358
Deaths46
Total Tested in Shelby County25,748
Tennessee Total Cases10,052*
*As of 2:00 p.m. 4/28/20
Other Jurisdictions:
Tipton County, TN95
Desoto County, MS266
Crittenden County, AR174
Numbers current as of 10:00 a.m. 4/28/2020

Shelby County currently has 2358 confirmed COVID-19 cases. The total number of deaths in Shelby County attributed to COVID-19 to 46.

Total COVID-19 Cases Recovered in Shelby County as of 04/27/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Note: “Recovered“ is defined as (1) people who are living and have been confirmed to be asymptomatic by the health department and have completed their required isolation period

or (2) are at least 21 days beyond the first test confirming their illness

The Shelby County Health Department is investigating clusters of infection in a number of facilities that serve vulnerable populations.

Map of COVID-19 testing in Shelby County as of 04/27/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Here is a breakdown of current cases in Shelby County by age range:

COVID-19 Cases in Shelby County by Age as of 04/27/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

COVID-19 Cases in Shelby County by Age as of 04/27/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Shelby County COVID-29 Cases by Race and Ethnicity as of 4/27/20

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Shelby County Health Department has added a data page to its COVID-19 webpage: www.shelbytnhealth.com/coronavirus.  It includes information about the geographic distribution of COVID-19 cases in Shelby County.

All of Shelby County, including the municipalities and the unincorporated areas are under Safer at Home orders. Only essential businesses as spelled out in Shelby County Mayor Lee Harris’s executive order of March 24, 2020, may remain open to the public. All assemblies and gatherings of more than 10 people outside of a private residence are prohibited. The list of essential and non-essential businesses can be viewed here.

For more information about the Safer at Home order or to register concerns, the public may contact:

· The Shelby County Mayor’s Action Line: 901-222-2300

· The Shelby County Health Department’s COVID-19 Hotline: 833-943-1658

· Email shelbytnhealth@shelbycountytn.gov.

Categories
Announcements

COVID-19 Update from Mayor Strickland (4/27)

Last week, I told you we would be bringing forth a plan to safely and methodically begin the reopening process for our community. While, we’re not ready to start that process just yet, we wanted to give you the guidelines and framework for what it will look like when we do get to that point.

Since the beginning, our approach has been one that is based on expert medical advice and data. This is no different. Reopening our city and getting our economy moving again is vitally important, but we must get back to business the right way.

As we look to reopen, we will base our decisions largely on three areas.

  1. The numbers of new cases are stable or declining for 14 days.
  2. Our hospitalizations are stable or declining for 14 days and our hospitals have capacity to treat all patients.
  3. Our testing and tracing capabilities are sufficient to contain the virus.

From that framework, our Memphis and Shelby County Back-to-Business plan was crafted. Many hours of hard work went into this plan, and the spirit of collaboration from all the municipalities across the county has been truly amazing to witness.

As I said, this was a tremendous undertaking with many moving parts, and I want to quickly thank the subgroup of the COVID-19 Joint Task Force that developed the framework for getting us back-to-business:

  • Kyle Veazey, Deputy Chief Operating Officer, City of Memphis and group coordinator
  • Amber Floyd, Deputy City Attorney
  • Jennifer Sink, Chief Legal Officer, City of Memphis
  • Doug McGowen, Chief Operating Officer, City of Memphis
  • Marlinee Iverson, Shelby County Attorney
  • Dwan Gilliom, Shelby County Chief Administrative Officer
  • Andre Gibson, Special Assistant to Shelby County Chief Administrative Officer
  • Dr. Alisa Haushalter, Shelby County Health Department
  • Dr. Jon McCullers, University of Tennessee Health Science Center
  • Dr. Manoj Jain, City of Memphis
  • Reid Dulberger, Economic Development Growth Engine

While we must remain vigilant about adhering to social distancing guidelines and hygiene practices, we felt it was time to safely start introducing measures that alleviate some burdens on the economy — while also balancing the need to protect our citizens. A phased approach, informed by data and constantly monitored and adjusted, will be used to get us safely back-to-business. The Safer at Home Order is still in effect, and this phased-in approach is simply a part of it.

Now, I’ll quickly go through some Phase 1 examples of the Back-to-Business Framework. This is not an exhaustive list.

  1. Healthcare—elective surgeries will be allowed.
  2. Restaurants— must maintain only 50% capacity with social distance seating between tables. No communal items. They must have paper menus, and employees must wear masks.
  3. Non-essential retail stores—must maintain only 50% capacity, and employees must wear masks.
  4. Libraries—must maintain 25% capacity while also adhering to social distancing guidelines, and employees must wear masks.

To see in detail more information on the phases and which business are included in each phase, visit our COVID-19.memphistn.gov page. We have the full framework laid out with all the key indicators and information used to make our decisions. If you have questions about where your Memphis organization fits in this framework, please email backtobusiness@memphistn.gov.

As we move forward, I want to stress that our approach will be data-driven and not date driven. And, we will not advance from one phase to the next until all the data points are telling us it is safe to do so.

Breaking down the numbers

As you look at the data in the chart below, you’ll notice there was an uptick in the number of confirmed cases over the weekend. There are a couple things to keep in mind, one is that a single data point doesn’t make a trend.

Over the last couple days, the number of tests given has exponentially increased, as well as, an increase in more targeted testing in areas where the virus seems to have created a cluster. The medical experts are closely monitoring this, but it is too early to tell how this weekend’s numbers affect the downward trend beginning seven to ten days ago.

Shelby County Health Department COVID-19 Daily Update: April 27, 2020

COVID-19 Cases
Shelby County Cases2320
Deaths45
Total Tested in Shelby County25,299
Tennessee Total Cases9,918*
*As of 2:00 p.m. 4/27/20
Other Jurisdictions:
Tipton County, TN94
Desoto County, MS261
Crittenden County, AR171
Numbers current as of 10:00 a.m. 4/27/2020

Shelby County currently has 2320 confirmed COVID-19 cases. The total number of deaths in Shelby County attributed to COVID-19 to 45.

Total COVID-19 Cases Recovered in Shelby County as of 04-26-2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Note: “Recovered“ is defined as (1) people who are living and have been confirmed to be asymptomatic by the health department and have completed their required isolation period

or (2) are at least 21 days beyond the first test confirming their illness

The Shelby County Health Department is investigating clusters of infection in a number of facilities that serve vulnerable populations.

Map of COVID-19 testing in Shelby County as of 04/26/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Here is a breakdown of current cases in Shelby County by age range:

COVID-19 Cases in Shelby County by Age as of 04/26/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

COVID-19 Cases in Shelby County by Age as of 04/26/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Shelby County COVID-29 Cases by Race and Ethnicity as of 4/26/20

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Shelby County Health Department has added a data page to its COVID-19 webpage: www.shelbytnhealth.com/coronavirus.  It includes information about the geographic distribution of COVID-19 cases in Shelby County.

All of Shelby County, including the municipalities and the unincorporated areas are under Safer at Home orders. Only essential businesses as spelled out in Shelby County Mayor Lee Harris’s executive order of March 24, 2020, may remain open to the public. All assemblies and gatherings of more than 10 people outside of a private residence are prohibited. The list of essential and non-essential businesses can be viewed here.

For more information about the Safer at Home order or to register concerns, the public may contact:

· The Shelby County Mayor’s Action Line: 901-222-2300

· The Shelby County Health Department’s COVID-19 Hotline: 833-943-1658

· Email shelbytnhealth@shelbycountytn.gov.

Categories
Announcements

A Back-to-Business Framework for Memphis & Shelby County

Working through the Joint COVID-19 Task Force, Shelby County government, the City of Memphis, and the six suburban municipalities have implemented proactive measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. These measures have helped mitigate the progression of the disease locally.

While the community should remain vigilant about adhering to social distancing guidelines and hygiene practices, local governments must also evaluate introducing measures that alleviate some burdens on the economy — while also balancing the need to protect citizens. A phased approach, informed by data and constantly monitored and adjusted, is the most prudent strategy for this. The approach will be informed by indicators (measurements of the status of the pandemic) and conditions (measurements of our capacity to deal with the pandemic), with policies and phasing flowing in response.

About this Framework

A flexible, data-driven approach to implementation of this framework is paramount. Additional phases and appropriate guidelines will be added as needed based on available data and expert recommendations. A dedicated email address and workflow will be established for authorities to consider and evaluate proposals for entities and/or industry groups to use alternative or additional methods of compliance.

Public messaging must be clear about the fluidity of this framework, so as to balance expectations with the requirement of adjusting guidelines based on data.

Shelby County, the City of Memphis, and the six suburban municipalities will enact this Back to Business framework through any applicable orders, including mayoral executive orders, resolutions, and ordinances. It is vitally important that as much as is practicable, the entire region operate under the same set of guidelines.

Shelby County, the City of Memphis, and the six suburban municipalities will vigorously enforce the orders developed from this plan, subject to the authorities granted. Success of the phased approach depends on consistent and timely communication, collaboration, and enforcement, as well as compliance by individual entities and the public.

In this framework, you will find the following items:

  1. Indicators and conditions that will drive decision-making
  2. Recommendations for each re-opening phase, including universal guidelines for all phases
  3. COVID-19 Compliant Protocol
  4. A grid (separate document) of sector-specific conditions for each phase

Indicators and conditions

The framework for this phased re-opening is premised on the following indicators and conditions:

In addition, the following contextual indicators will be monitored to provide further information for decision-making:

  • Trend in COVID-19 deaths
  • Hospitalizations of COVID-19 positive patients
  • Percentage of ventilators utilized in healthcare system
  • Percentage of hospital beds utilized in healthcare system
  • COVID-19 Compliant Protocol compliance by entities, monitoring reports from law and code enforcement
  • Social distancing compliance by members of the public
  • Adequate supplies of PPE, monitoring inventory assessments of healthcare system and Joint Task Force (for first responders)

Using the above metrics, the Back to Business subgroup of the Joint Task Force will meet frequently to review, evaluate potential adjustments, and make recommendations to leadership. This could include reversals of advancements between phases based on negative trends in the data and metrics. Trends that would prompt a reversal do not necessarily have to be 14-day trends.

A dashboard of these metrics will be created for ongoing decision support and public visibility on progress toward phase implementation.

Phase Guidelines

Universal requirements applicable to all phases

All entities must comply with the following universal guidelines, which are applicable to all phases:

  • Implementation of COVID-19 Compliant Protocol (CCP) (attached as Appendix A).
  • Adherence to social distancing protocol as outlined by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).
  • Adherence to sanitization practices as outlined by the CDC.
  • Encourage and facilitate telework and minimize business travel to the greatest extent possible.
  • Implementation of policies to ensure employees do not work when ill.
  • Adherence to all other applicable CDC and industry “best practice” guidance and regulations.

Phase One

Indicators and conditions to enter this phase:

  • New cases: Green
  • System capacity: Green or yellow
  • Public health capacity: Green on all categories
  • Testing: Green or yellow (availability), green (capacity), green (timing)

General recommendations

  • Operations remain status quo for entities currently deemed essential, provided they continue to meet the CCP conditions.
  • Entities currently deemed non-essential, which have limited personal contact between staff and/or visitors, may re-open facilities with restrictions and limited occupancy as outlined in the sector-specific framework. This includes restaurants and gyms/fitness facilities.
  • Purposeful groups of more than 10 are not permitted.
  • Indoor and outdoor facilities and public spaces may open for general recreation and non-contact sports subject to the restrictions of the CCP.
  • Non-essential manufacturers/distributors, as well as offices and call centers, may re-open with restrictions and limited occupancy as outlined in the sector-specific framework.
  • Elective medical procedures that are deemed medically necessary may resume.

Phase Two

Indicators and conditions to enter this phase

  • New cases: Green for a 14-day period after entering Phase One
  • System capacity: Green or yellow
  • Public health capacity: Green on all categories
  • Testing: Green or yellow (availability), green (capacity), green (timing)

General recommendations

  • Non-essential businesses with close personal contact, such as hair and nail salons, may re-open with restrictions and limited occupancy as outlined in the sector-specific framework.
  • Facilities for contact sports may re-open with restrictions and limited occupancy as outlined in the sector-specific framework.
  • Purposeful groups of 50 or more not permitted.

Phase Three

Indicators and conditions to enter this phase

  • New cases: Green for a 14-day period after entering Phase Two
  • System capacity: Green or yellow
  • Public health capacity: Green on all categories
  • Testing: Green (availability), green (capacity), green (timing)

General recommendations

  • Purposeful groups of 50 or more are not permitted, although gatherings of 50+ may be allowable if supported by the characteristics of the space and a clear social distancing plan.
  • Larger venues may be permitted to operate under limited capacity and physical distancing protocols.

Appendix A: COVID-19 Compliant Protocol

All entities will be required to adhere to this protocol, which will be posted in checklist format for entities to print and utilize. The standards may be revised from time to time, based on data and expert recommendations.

Signage

  • Post a sign at each public entrance to the facility to inform all employees and customers that they should:
    • Avoid entering the facility if they have a cough, fever, or other signs/symptoms of COVID-19
    • Maintain a minimum six-foot distance between individuals, or entire household units of up to six persons defined as residing at the same address, and other individuals
    • Sneeze or cough into a cloth or tissue or, if unavailable, into one’s arm
    • Not shake hands of engage in any unnecessary physical contact
  • Post a copy of the COVID-19 Compliant Protocol at each public entrance to the facility.

Measures to protect employee health (where applicable to the facility)

  • Everyone who can carry out their work duties from home, as determined by their employer, has been directed to do so.
  • All employees have been told not to come to work if they are sick.
  • Relevant COVID-19 symptom screenings are being conducted before employees may enter the work space.
  • Employers must establish work arrangements so that employees are separated by at least six feet or an impermeable barrier while at their desks or individual work stations.
  • Break rooms, restrooms, other common areas, and high-tough surfaces are being disinfected frequently, on the following schedule:
    • Break rooms: [Entity must specify]
    • Restrooms: [Entity must specify]
    • Other: [Entity must specify]
  • Disinfectant and related supplies are available to all employees at the following locations: [Entity must specify]
  • Hand sanitizer effective against COVID-19 is available to all employees at the following locations: [Entity must specify]
  • Soap and water are available to all employees at the following locations: [Entity must specify]
  • Facial coverings are available to all employees whose duties and interactions with fellow employees subject them to CDC recommendations requiring them.
  • Copies of this Protocol have been distributed to all employees.
  • Other measures to protect employees: [Entity may specify]

Measures to protect visitor/customer health

  • Disinfecting wipes or comparable disinfectants that are effective against COVID-19 are available near items frequently touched by visitors, such as shopping carts or baskets.
  • Employee(s) assigned to regularly disinfect items frequently touched by visitors.
  • Hand sanitizer, soap and water, or other disinfectant effective against COVID-19 are available to visitors at or near the entrance of the facility and at transaction points.
  • All methods for contactless transactions are implemented. Where this is not feasible, components of transaction points such as portals, pens, and styluses are disinfected after each use.
  • All other high-contact surfaces must frequently be disinfected.
  • Other measures to protect visitors/customers: [Entity may specify]

Measures to ensure physical separation

  • For entities and indoor locations where staff and/or visitors generally circulate, limit the number of visitors in the facility at any one time to occupancy percentages specified in the framework.
  • For entities and indoor locations where staff and/or visitors are generally stationary, people must be kept a minimum of six feet apart as measured in a straight line from one person or member of a household unit to the next closest person, not including an impermeable internal or external wall or divider of at least eight feet high.
  • Post an employee at entrance doors to ensure that the maximum number of customers in the facility, as specified above, is not exceeded.
  • Place signs outside the facility reminding people to be at least six feet apart when inside the facility, including when in any lines.
  • Placing tape or other markings at least six feet apart in customer or employee line areas inside facilities and on sidewalks at public entrances with signs directing customers to use the markings to maintain distance.
  • Separate order areas from delivery/fulfillment areas to prevent customers from gathering.
  • Instruct employees to maintain at least a six-foot distance from customers and from each other, except employees may momentarily come closer when necessary to accept payment, deliver goods or services, or as otherwise necessary.
  • To reduce crowds and lines, place per-person or household unit limits on goods that are selling out quickly. [Entity may explain.]
  • Other measures to ensure physical separation: [Entity may explain]

Measures to prevent unnecessary contact

  • Prevent visitors from self-serving any food items.
  • Provide items such as lids for cups and condiments by staff, not for customers to procure on their own.
  • Bulk-item food or supply bins are not available for customer self-service use.
  • Consider providing specific hours only for specific populations such as seniors and pregnant women.
  • Other measures to prevent unnecessary contact: [Entity may specify]

A Back-to-Business Framework for Memphis & Shelby County

Categories
Announcements

COVID-19 Update from Mayor Strickland (4-22)

As you may have seen yesterday, I extended our Safer at Home Executive Order for an additional two weeks through May 5th. In the extension, we included some additional conditions, as well as, lifted some restrictions. These changes were made with an eye towards the future when we can get back to business.

I’ll quickly go through the highlights.

  • Effective Friday at 6:00 am, all “big-box retailers” of groceries and hardware items, such as Target, Kroger, Walmart and Walgreens, will be required to implement Covid-19 Compliant Protocols, including:
    • Limiting the number of people who can enter the facility at any given time, such that people can easily maintain a 6-foot distance from each other
  • Establishing waiting lines (inside and outside the store) by marking six-foot increments to allow for social distancing
  • Providing hand sanitizer at the entrances
  • Requiring employees to wear facial coverings when in spaces accessible to the public
  • Providing at least one hour of controlled access every day to customers over 55, pregnant, or have serious underlying conditions
  • Members of the public are strongly encouraged to wear facial coverings when engaging with others or entering a place of business.
  • Consistent with the Health Department Directives, fully automated car washes will be allowed to operate, but all ancillary amenities, such as the vacuums, must be closed for public use. 
  • Also, consistent with the Health Department Directives and the successful trial we did this past weekend, golf courses will be allowed to operate beginning this weekend, subject to implementation and compliance with Covid-19 Compliant Protocols specific to golf courses. Below are those protocols.
  • At this time, we are opening five of the eight public courses—Links at Galloway, Links at Audubon, Links at Fox Meadows, Links at Pine Hill, and we opened the Links at Whitehaven this past weekend.
  • The Links at Overton Park, Links at Riverside, Links at Davy Crockett will remain closed for the time being.

To see the full Order, go here.

Back to Business

Recently, I’ve received several questions regarding our reopening and how the Governor lifting his order May 1st will affect us. I want you to know we’re in constant communication with the Governor’s office as well as the mayors of the other three large cities across our state and cities within Shelby County.

To remind everyone—the Governor’s order only affects 89 counties across the state. Shelby County is not one of them.

Since the beginning, our approach has been one that is based on medical advice and data. Reopening our city and getting our economy moving again is vitally important, but we must to get back to business the right way. We cannot squander all the good we have done with our social distancing efforts to slow the spread of the virus.

As we look to reopen, we will base our decisions largely on three areas:

  • The numbers of new cases are stable or declining for a period of time.
  • Our hospitalizations are stable or declining for period of time and our hospitals have capacity to treat all patients.
  • Our testing and tracing capabilities are sufficient to contain the virus.

There will be more to come on this over the next two weeks as our economic recovery group is working on this daily. We will quantify these indicators or conditions and communicate them, so everyone will understand how we get back to business safely.

Finally, I just wanted to thank Ron and Carolyn Kent and Jasmine and King Chow for donating 10,000 surgical masks to the Memphis Housing Authority. I’ve said this before but the generosity of so many in our community has been amazing to see during this crisis.

Breaking down the numbers

If you haven’t figured out yet, I’m a data and a numbers guy. It’s how I make decisions, and in this situation, it helps to paint the overall picture. Below is a look at the number over a two-week period.

As we move forward and begin to look at reopening businesses, hopefully this graph will help you understand our decision-making process as we work to get our economy back on track.

Safer at Home Enforcement

Shelby County Health Department COVID-19 Daily Update: April 22, 2020

COVID-19 Cases
Shelby County Cases1894
Deaths41
Total Tested in Shelby County20,315
Tennessee Total Cases7,842*
*As of 2:00 p.m. 4/22/20
Other Jurisdictions:
Tipton County, TN83
Desoto County, MS239
Crittenden County, AR147
Numbers current as of 10:00 a.m. 4/22/2020

Shelby County currently has 1894 confirmed COVID-19 cases. The total number of deaths in Shelby County attributed to COVID-19 to 41.

The Shelby County Health Department is investigating clusters of infection in a number of facilities that serve vulnerable populations.

Map of COVID-19 cases in Shelby County as of 04/21/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Here is a breakdown of current cases in Shelby County by age range:

COVID-19 Cases in Shelby County by Age as of 04/21/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

COVID-19 Cases in Shelby County by Age as of 04/21/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Shelby County COVID-29 Cases by Race and Ethnicity as of 4/21/20

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Shelby County Health Department has added a data page to its COVID-19 webpage: www.shelbytnhealth.com/coronavirus.  It includes information about the geographic distribution of COVID-19 cases in Shelby County.

All of Shelby County, including the municipalities and the unincorporated areas are under Safer at Home orders. Only essential businesses as spelled out in Shelby County Mayor Lee Harris’s executive order of March 24, 2020, may remain open to the public. All assemblies and gatherings of more than 10 people outside of a private residence are prohibited. The list of essential and non-essential businesses can be viewed here.

For more information about the Safer at Home order or to register concerns, the public may contact:

· The Shelby County Mayor’s Action Line: 901-222-2300

· The Shelby County Health Department’s COVID-19 Hotline: 833-943-1658

· Email shelbytnhealth@shelbycountytn.gov.

Categories
Announcements City Council

COVID-19 Update from Mayor Strickland (4-21)

Today, I made my budget presentation for the next fiscal year to City Council. While it may be our custom to get together during the second meeting in April with a detailed proposed new budget, I am presenting in an environment that is anything but “business as usual”.

Cities across our state and across our nation are facing a major public health emergency, record unemployment, and an unprecedented financial crisis.  Simply put, the demand and the need for core local government services has and will continue to increase significantly, and at the same time we are all projecting drastic levels of revenue shortages.

To read my full speech and see my revenue slides, click here.

Categories
Announcements

COVID-19 Update from Mayor Strickland (4/20)

Last Friday, we kicked off the Mayor’s Meal Challenge, and like I knew it would be, the response was overwhelming. My phone was buzzing all weekend from everyone tagging my social media pages. On top of everyone showing their support for some of our great local restaurants, we raised $2,500 for the Mid-South Food Bank.

And, we’re going to do more. Because the weekend was such a success, others in the community have stepped forward and pledged up to $11,800 to the challenge which we need 472 more people to eat local and post a picture of their meal.

So, a quick reminder on how to participate:

  • Pick up a “to-go” order from local restaurants
  • Post your photos of the food on social media and
  • Tag the City of Memphis or my Facebook page @CityofMemphis or @MayorMemphis and Twitter @CityofMemphis or @MayorMemphis and the restaurant’s page
  • Include the Hashtags #MayorsMealChallenge and #saferathome

If you would like to donate to the food bank visit www.midsouthfoodbank.org/donate.  Under the “My Donation is for” tab, select the Mayor’s Meal Challenge.

Testing

I’ve said this before, but if you or someone you know has not been tested, and you’re experiencing symptoms, even minor ones—get tested. We have the resources readily available, and they’re all free.

You don’t need a doctor’s referral, but you do have to make an appointment.

At this time, we are not—let me say that again–we are not testing asymptomatic individuals. For a full list of test sites, click here. We’re trying to make this as easy as possible. On the covid19.memphistn.gov site, we even have an interactive map in which you can type in your address and it tells you the closest testing site to your home.

There is no reason you shouldn’t get tested. The resources are there and waiting to be used. Please use them.

Safer at Home Enforcement

Quick update on our enforcement numbers:

Shelby County Health Department COVID-19 Daily Update: April 20, 2020

COVID-19 Cases
Shelby County Cases1807
Deaths38
Total Tested in Shelby County19,195
Tennessee Total Cases7,238*
*As of 2:00 p.m. 4/20/20
Other Jurisdictions:
Tipton County, TN56
Desoto County, MS234
Crittenden County, AR139
Numbers current as of 10:00 a.m. 4/20/2020

Shelby County currently has 1807 confirmed COVID-19 cases. The total number of deaths in Shelby County attributed to COVID-19 to 38.

The Shelby County Health Department is investigating clusters of infection in a number of facilities that serve vulnerable populations.

Map of COVID-19 cases in Shelby County as of 04/19/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Here is a breakdown of current cases in Shelby County by age range: COVID-19 Cases in Shelby County by Age as of 04/19/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

COVID-19 Cases in Shelby County by Age as of 04/19/2020

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Shelby County COVID-29 Cases by Race and Ethnicity as of 4/19/20

Note:  Missing/Unknown = 524 (29.0%)

Note:  Missing/Unknown = 625 (34.6%)

Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS)

Shelby County Health Department has added a data page to its COVID-19 webpage: www.shelbytnhealth.com/coronavirus.  It includes information about the geographic distribution of COVID-19 cases in Shelby County.

All of Shelby County, including the municipalities and the unincorporated areas are under Safer at Home orders. Only essential businesses as spelled out in Shelby County Mayor Lee Harris’s executive order of March 24, 2020, may remain open to the public. All assemblies and gatherings of more than 10 people outside of a private residence are prohibited. The list of essential and non-essential businesses can be viewed here.

For more information about the Safer at Home order or to register concerns, the public may contact:

· The Shelby County Mayor’s Action Line: 901-222-2300

· The Shelby County Health Department’s COVID-19 Hotline: 833-943-1658

· Email shelbytnhealth@shelbycountytn.gov.

Categories
Announcements

Mayor Strickland launches Mayor’s Meal Challenge to help Mid-South Food Bank

Mayor Strickland will donate up to $2,500 to the Mid-South Food Bank for the first 100 photos that residents tag the City’s Facebook page featuring a to-go order purchased from a local Memphis restaurant.

“I was inspired by Arlington Mayor Jeff Williams and decided to follow suit with the Mayor’s Meal Challenge for our community to support our local restaurants as well as help provide funds for meals for the Mid-South Food Bank” says Mayor Strickland.  “I am also challenging other leaders to help me keep the shelves of the food bank stocked to help Memphians who are in need during this time.”

To participate in the Mayor’s Meal Challenge:

  • Pick up a “to-go” order from local restaurants
  • Post photos of the food on social media and
  • Tag the City of Memphis Facebook page @City of Memphis or Twitter @CityofMemphis and the restaurant’s page
  • Include Hashtags  #MayorsMealChallenge  and #saferathome

We encourage residents to continue to shop local and support small businesses, while practicing social distancing. If you would like to donate to the food bank visit www.midsouthfoodbank.org/donate.

Visit covid19.memphistn.gov to learn more or find small business assistance information.